Translating Improvisation | Seminar by Juan Manuel Loaiza “Authorship in music social-ecosystems? The challenges of a radical openness in musical practice”

Seminar by Juan Manuel Loaiza “Authorship in music social-ecosystems? The challenges of a radical openness in musical practice”


  • 01 Dec


  • tirg

Authorship in music social-ecosystems? The challenges of a radical openness in musical practice
Seminar by Juan Manuel Loaiza (PhD candidate, SARC, School of Creative Arts)
21 November 2014
2.30-3.30 pm, Multimedia Room
Sonic Arts Research Centre


ABSTRACT: In my research and as a practitioner I try to bring together two apparently disparate areas of musical concern. The first is a politically pregnant approach to music that privileges the focus on agency, and the complicated relationship of autonomy and participation (organizational in Wenger 1998, anthropological in Gell 1998, musicological in Born 2010, amongst many others). The second is a new player in the field of music coming from a revolutionized area of cognitive sciences and philosophy: the enactive philosophy of embodiment (inaugurated by Varela, Thompson and Rosch in 1991, and in constant development in Di Paolo and Thompson 2014, Hutto et al. 2014, amongst others). Enaction proposes the non-localization of cognitive-affective processes and the fundamental intersubjective aspect of the embodied mind. The bridging idea to be explored in the presentation is that of a radical openness in practice to the complex social distribution of cognitive and affective processes in the vicinity of sounds. The awareness and realization that musical ecosystems are not only constituted by performers and machines but also necessarily by the -bodily- sociality enacted within unfolding dynamical systems of actions, leaves the received ideas of authorship and musical-curatorial expertise in suspense. Thus, how can the socio-ecological aware practitioner proceed from this realization? What is the role of the practitioner when the localization of a centre of action is questioned in favour of  an ‘undisciplined ‘participatory approach? Finally, how might compositional practices be rethought through such a politicized, radical openness? The presentation will bring the above theoretical insights together with reflections from my own ongoing collaborative projects and creative practice.